Challenging prejudice today

Preventing Prejudice

Anne Frank was one of 1.5 million Jewish children murdered by the Nazis during the Holocaust. Sadly, from workplaces to school playgrounds, prejudice, discrimination and racial hatred still exist.

Anne’s message and our work

Since its publication in 1947, Anne’s diary has been read by millions of people worldwide. By learning about her life and times, we can relate what happened then to what is happening now in our own lives and communities.

Our work in schools, prisons and communities educates about the damage and suffering caused by prejudice and hatred. Everyone has a part to play in taking a stand against it.

 

A hate crime is an offence motivated by hostility based on disability, race, religion, gender identity or sexual orientation.

 In 2015/16, there were 62,518 offences recorded by the police, an increase of 19 per cent compared with 2014/15, of which:

  • 49,419 (79%) were race hate crimes; (Home Office 2015/2016)
  • 7,194 (12%) were sexual orientation hate crimes; (Home Office 2015/16)
  • 4,400 (7%) were religion hate crimes; (Home Office 2015/16)
  • 3,629 (6%) were disability hate crimes; and(Home Office 2015/16)
  • 858 (1%) were transgender hate crimes; (Home Office 2015/16)

(Home Office 2015/16)

 
 

Metropolitan Police statistics in London show:

Islamophobic Crime:

An Islamophobic Offence is any offence which is perceived to be Islamophobic by the victim or any other person, that is intended to impact upon those known or perceived to be Muslim.

  • 1,052 crimes (12 months to December '15)
  • 1,221 crimes (12 months to December '16)
  • +16.1% increase

Anti-Semitism Crime:

An Anti-Semitic Offence is any offence which is perceived to be Anti-Semitic by the victim or any other person, that is intended to impact upon those known or perceived to be Jewish.

  • 460 crimes (12 months to December '15)
  • 513 crimes (12 months to December '16)
  • +11.5% increase
 

 

Take a look at our short film about stereotyping below:

 

 

Actress Naomie Harris, renowned for her recent roles as Miss Moneypenny in Skyfall and Winnie Mandela, has kindly agreed to become the Trust’s latest patron. See this short interview above where she explains why she feels the Trust’s work is so important.